The USS Indianapolis (CA-35) A New Article by Walt Mow

7-16-16 10:31 AM EST: In the aftermath of the First World War a series of armament agreements sought to restrict tonnage limits of capital ships. These tonnage limits also controlled the number of capital ships the signatory nations were allowed. Five nations signed the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 intended to forestall a naval arms race. The five signatory nations were: the United Kingdom; the United States; Japan; France and Italy.

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Marie-Joseph Paul Roch Yves Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

7-15-16 3:07 PM EST: That's a mouthful isn't it? You probably recognize the last portion of that breathtaking name. A very young, wealthy, titled, Frenchman who came to America and befriended General George Washington. A unique friendship between a man who never had a son and a son who never knew his father. Lafayette named his own son George Washington and became a hero to both America and France. A man of principles, humility, innate leadership abilities, courage, and bravery.

Please also read read the link down below: "Ten things you may not know about Marquis de Lafayette." Very interesting...along with a sincere PolitiBrew SALUTE!

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August 6, 1945: The U.S. Drops an Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima!

8-6-16 3:33 PM EST: "On this day in 1945, at 8:16 a.m. Japanese time, an American B-29 bomber, the Enola Gay, drops the world’s first atom bomb, over the city of Hiroshima. Approximately 80,000 people are killed as a direct result of the blast, and another 35,000 are injured. At least another 60,000 would be dead by the end of the year from the effects of the fallout.

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July 3, 1775: Washington Takes Command of Continental Army

7-3-16 9:00 AM EST: "On this day in 1775, George Washington rides out in front of the American troops gathered at Cambridge common in Massachusetts and draws his sword, formally taking command of the Continental Army. Washington, a prominent Virginia planter and veteran of the French and Indian War, had been appointed commander in chief by the Continental Congress two weeks before. In agreeing to serve the American colonies in their war for independence, he declined to accept payment for his services beyond reimbursement of future expenses.

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